The Blanket Made By Zadie

Itzik the Schneider was a tailor and everything he sewed was filled with love and faith. When his ainikle (grandson) was born, he sewed a very special blanket that kept the baby warm. As the boy grew, the blanket began to tatter and tear, so zadie took his scissors, needle and thread and made his grandson a coat out of that worn out old blanket.

The coat kept the boy warm as he went to school and played with his friends. The boy loved the coat so much, he was hardly without it. Little boys grow but not coats, and one the coat no longer fit the boy. Again, zadie took his scissors, needle and thread and cut down his grandson’s coat into a vest. The boy loved the vest and wore it almost everywhere, but one day as he was working on a special project for his zadie (grandfather), some paint and glue splattered onto the vest. The vest was ruined and the boy was very upset. Zadie, however, looked at the vest and then to his grandson, told him to not worry, and took the vest, the scissors, needle and some thread and made a wonderful tie for his grandson. The boy wore the tie to school and many special occasions, he loved the tie very much. The boy was visiting his zadie (grandfather) for a holiday and as they sat and ate, zadie was telling stories and singing songs something terrible happened, the tie became stained with soup and food. The boy was very sad, Zadie looked at the tie and smiled.


Yiddish Tailor

After the holiday he took the tie, his scissors, needle and a little thread and made a handkerchief for his grandson. The boy used his special handkerchief until it became tattered and worn. The boy was very gloomy, so zadie took the handkerchief, his scissors, needle and some thread and made small cloth covered button. The boy was very happy and he wore it, button every single day and then…. One day, the button fell off. He looked everywhere but could not find the button that his zadie made for him with needle, some thread and a lot of love. He sat down and cried for a very long time. He found it hard to think or even meet with his friends but then…. One day, he took a pen in his hand and some paper and began to draw and write.

He remembered the blanket, the coat, the vest, the tie, the handkerchief, the cloth covered button, and all the good times he enjoyed with each of these items. He drew pictures and wrote stories about each thing and shared them with his friends. He soon began to understand that while the past can no longer be the present he can always remember.

The same is true for each of us when we suffer a loss.  The sadness that we experience is very real but with time, and sometimes a lot of it, we can begin to appreciate new things about ourselves, our families, our friends, and our community. This does not mean that the person has been erased, it means that we remember and will never forget them because those memories are forever.

May the memories of all your loved ones be a source of strength and blessing

and

May all your tales end with Shalom (peace)

Click here for more storytelling resources  

Tell it to your children, and let your children tell it to their children, and their children to the next generation. (Joel 1:3) 

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A Chanukah Gift of Stories

What does a story teller give as gifts for Chanukah?

Stories of course.

The Season of Lights – Chanukah is coming very quickly as it begins at Sundown on December 12, 2017.  Most people in the Jewish communities throughout the world can rattle off a list of Chanukah traditions such as lighting the menorah each night; playing dreidel games; eating foods cooked in oil (latkes and Sufganiot); and exchanging gifts. 

The age-old tradition of telling stories in the glow of the Chanukah menorah is fading as people turn to their cell phone, computers and social media. The stories carry messages of greatness, nobility, and wisdom while at the same time raising the hopes for a better tomorrow. 

Please read and enjoy the stories below aboutChanukah. Share them with others, comment, join in a discussion, or just “like” the stories and tell us which are your favorites.

Chanukah

 Chanukah during the Holocaust, 20th Century Miracle – An Article from 1981

Chanukah stories

Chanukah and Passover are celbrations of freedom. What do they have in common?Chanukah – Egypt – Passover: Is There a Connection

Chanukah stories

The Jewish people have fought throughout history for faith, Chanuka and the Fighters

Chanukah stories

Chanukah is a celebration of Jewish Women, Chanukah: The Dedication of Jewish women


Chanukah stories

The flame of faith burns bright on Chanukah, The Chanukah Flame of Faith

Chanukah stories

Dreidel is more than just a game, The Mystery of the Dreidel

Chanukah Stories

a short Chanukah story about growth and self improvement, A short Chanukah story, Can One Fix a Spirit on Chanukah

Chanukah Stories

There is more to see than just the menorah, Chanukah Lights and the Blessings of Sight, allows one to see others in a special light.

Chanukah Stories

The lights of the menorah warms people to their very soul and  brings about  Shalom Bayis, Torah and the Menorah of Peace

Chanukah Stories

May all your tales end with Shalom (peace)

Tell it to your children, and let your children tell it to their children, and their children to the next generation. (Joel 1:3) Please share these gifts of wonderful stories with others and start or join a discussion on the Story Tour Blog about the stories.

The Story Tour Blog has grown to over 300 short stories about faith. Many visitors to the Story Tour Blog have requested that the stories be gathered together into a book. 72 of these special tales are now available in the new book that would make a special gift for Chanukah

ORDER YOURS TODAY 

Story Tour: The Journey Begins

StoryTourBook1

Available at Amazon and Barnes & Noble

Click here for the the new book, Story Tour: The Journey Begins filled with 72 stories from the Story Tour Blog

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The Powdered Gem

Once there was a king who was known for his wisdom and kindness and he had a son. He loved his son and hoped that he would grow in knowledge and strength, so he sent him off to faraway lands to learn about the many ways people see and understand the world around them. The prince studied the nature of foreign plants and art of making powders and potions to heal. He discovered several different ways of speech and communication in the many lands he traveled through. After a few years the prince returned to his father.

The king was proud of his son and was sure that he would grow into a fine leader. One day, the prince told his father he wasn’t feeling well and took to his bed. As the days went by the prince became so sick he stopped eating. The king called for the doctors and they told him the prince had fallen gravely ill, and that they were unable to find a cure for his illness. The king sent messengers throughout the kingdom offering great reward if someone could cure his son.

One day a man from a faraway land came to the palace and claimed to know a cure for the prince’s illness. He described a certain precious stone which, if one would grind it to the finest of powders, mix it with a fine wine, and give it to the prince to drink —he would be cured.

The gem needed for the cure was very rare, and could not be found anywhere in the kingdom and beyond. Only one of the needed precious stones was to be found in the center of the royal crown. Removing this gem would mean destroying the ancient crown. The crown had been the symbol of the royal family for over 50 generations and it was the king’s most precious possession.

Story Tour Gem

The king’s ministers were happy to discover the gem, but they were distressed that they would have to destroy the royal crown to provide it to be ground up for the cure for the prince. Sadly, informed the king that the precious stone for the prince’s cure had been found.

The king was happy to receive such good news and commanded that the precious stone be removed from the royal crown and be ground to a fine powder to prepare the cure for his son. The king then ordered that the cure be made as quickly as possible.

As the cure was being prepared, terrible news that the prince’s condition had worsened and that his breathing was slow, his heart beat hardly heard that his lips were sealed shut. The prince was so sick that he could take anything, not even liquids, into his mouth.  The nobles and royal physicians in the palace were certain that, under the circumstances, the king would surely direct that the stone not be ground, so that the honor and splendor of the royal crown could be preserved.

Everyone was shocked when the king commanded them to hurry and crush the gem and to prepare the medicine without delay, and then to pour it into the mouth of the prince.

“Destroy the crown, grind the stone to powder, make the medicine”, the king said frantically, “Who knows? Hopefully a single drop will enter the mouth of my son, and he will be healed.”

The king in his wisdom realized that “No crown carries such royalty as that of humility” (Rokeach, 13th Cent) and that the Holy One, blessed be He “created medicines out of the earth, and let not discerning man reject them. (ben Sira 38:4)

In a world of choices one can become very confused and distracted by many things. It is very hard to focus on what is important, but in all circumstances one should “Choose life so that you and your descendants may live” (Deuteronomy 30:19)

May all your tales end with Shalom (peace)

Click here for more storytelling resources 

 Tell it to your children, and let your children tell it to their children, and their children to the next generation. (Joel 1:3) 

Please share this story with family and friends and let us know what you think or feel about the stories in a comment or two. Like us on Facebook  or tweet us on Twitter 

If the stories are not shared they will be lost. 

Please share this story with others

The Story Tour Blog has grown to over 300 short stories about faith. Many visitors to the Story Tour Blog have requested that the stories be gathered together into a book. 72 of these special tales are now available in the new book that would make a special gift for Chanukah

ORDER YOURS TODAY

 Story Tour: The Journey Begins

 is available from the publisher, Xlibris

or from

Barnes & Noble, Booksamillion, and Amazon

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Stories From Story Tour Blog Available in Book

Story Tour

The Season of Lights – Chanukah is coming very quickly as it begins at Sundown on December 12, 2017.  Most people in the Jewish communities throughout the world can rattle off a list of Chanukah traditions such as lighting the menorah each night; playing dreidel games; eating foods cooked in oil (latkes and Sufganiot); and exchanging gifts. 

An age-old tradition is telling stories in the glow of the Chanukah menorah. The stories tell of greatness, nobility, and wisdom while at the same time raising the hopes for a better tomorrow. 

The very backdrop to the spiritual stories is attractive to its readers allowing one to peek into the beliefs, and lifestyles of a vanishing age of a faraway world and reminding them that the messages are eternal – just as strong today as they were yesterday. 

The book, Story Tour: The Journey Begins will remind readers of forgotten stories of faith that strengthen and reaffirm hope for a better world. 

Buy a copy of Story Tour: The Journey Begins as a gift for someone special today. Story Tour: The Journey Begins is available from the publisher, Xlibris http://bookstore.xlibris.com/Products/SKU-000905091/Story-Tour.aspx   or online at Booksamillion, and Barnes & Noble, and Amazon

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Who’s So Great?

Leaders from all corners of the country came together in the capital city to find a way to have the harsh anti-Semitic laws abolished.  Religious schools were being closed and the excessive tax on candles made every day life for the Jewish community very difficult. The leaders hoped to find a way to ease the pain of the many people affected by the unfair laws.

Some of the community leaders took advantage of meeting to boast of their many accomplishments and to remind others how important they were. One holy rabbi sat and listened to the ongoing bragging and was justifiably upset especially since the focus should have been on finding ways to have the oppressive laws abolished.

When the holy rabbi stood before the community leaders, he decided to teach a strong lesson:

“The donkeys once came before the Ribbono shel Olam, Master of the Universe with a complaint: Why had He assigned them the role of being beasts of burden? Couldn’t He have allotted them a better role in life? Why not give them the power of speech so that they could accomplish things with their thoughts just as humans do, instead of being limited to physical labor?

“G-d agreed that they had a legitimate point, and told them that He would experiment by giving the wisest of them the capacity to talk, which He did with Bilaam’s donkey. But lo and behold! As soon as the creature was empowered to speak, what did it announce? ‘Am I not your donkey, which you have ridden all your life to this day? Have I been in the habit of treating you this way?’ (Numbers 22:30).”

“G-d therefore decided, ‘If all a donkey can talk about is his own great achievements, he is better off being silent.’  People might be tempted to spiritual pride — tempted to think to ourselves, Look how valuable I am to the Holy One, blessed be He and look what He has done through me!’ ”

May all your tales end with Shalom (peace)

Click here for more storytelling resources 

Tell it to your children, and let your children tell it to their children, and their children to the next generation. (Joel 1:3) 

Please share this story with family and friends and let us know what you think or feel about the stories in a comment or two. Like us on Facebook  or tweet us on Twitter

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The Wealthy Man Gets Cold Feet

Tam and Chacham traveled the streets of the village collecting funds to help the many people suffering from the cold winter. Snow had made many roads impassable and life was very difficult.

In the village lived a very wealthy man. Every time Tam and Chacham came to his door to collect funds for the poor, the wealthy man would invite them in, offer them tea and talk about his business. When Tam and Chacham started talking about the plight of the poor people in the winter, the wealthy man would brush the off telling them that poor people like to complain and exaggerate — it wasn’t all as bad as they thought. Any way, he had no cash in the house at the moment, and couldn’t give anything at that time, asking if they could come back another time? The wealthy man escorted Tam and Chacham to the door, go back to his warm and comfortable room and settle down in his favorite chair near the fireplace, very pleased with himself.

Jewish Miser

Tam and Chacham were not very happy that the wealthy man could so easily dismiss the hardships and needs of those less fortunate. The poor had no money for food or for wood for their stoves, and they were cold and hungry. After much thought, Tam had an idea.

One evening Tam knocked on the wealthy man’s door. It was a cold and miserable night; snow and sleet blew through the deserted streets. The wealthy man asked Tam into his warm house, as usual. But Tam refused. “No,” he said, “I won’t be long.” And then he asked about the wealthy man’s health and after the health of his family, and asked him about his business, and spoke about the affairs of the community for a long time. The wealthy man could not send Tam away, of course; he had opened the door for him himself. The biting air was blowing fiercely and he was getting quite uncomfortable. He had come to the door in his slippers and yarmulke, dressed in a thin shirt and his house pants.

Tam, wearing a warm coat with a fur lining, his large fur lined cap covering his ears and heavy winter boots encasing his feet and legs, talked on and on. He didn’t want to come into the wealthy man’s house, kept telling the wealthy man that he only had one more thing to say and the he’d be on his way. The wealthy man’s toes grew stiff with the icy cold wind.

Suddenly the wealthy man understood. “Oh, Tam!” he cried. “Those poor people with no warm clothes or firewood for winter . . . I never knew. I never imagined it could be like this. This is terrible. It is horrible. I never knew, honestly! Something must be done!” He went into the house and returned with a purse full of gold coins. He wanted to go back to his fireplace as soon as he could. He needed hot tea. Tam thanked him and gave him a blessing that he should always be so generous. He too was cold after that long talk, but he didn’t mind. The poor people would have a good winter this year.

The wealthy man changed his ways that night. He became a regular contributor to the funds collected by Tam and Chacham for the poor, for poor brides, for poor students, for Passover money and for many other causes. He had learned a good lesson that night.

May all your tales end with Shalom (peace)

Click here for more storytelling resources  

Tell it to your children, and let your children tell it to their children, and their children to the next generation. (Joel 1:3) 

Please share this story with family and friends and let us know what you think or feel about the stories in a comment or two. Like us on Facebook  or tweet us on Twitter

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A Bag of Rocks; A Bag of Diamonds

It was a cold wintry Friday night as a group of young people crowded around a Shabbos table. They were talking of many things from politics to religion. Most of all they challenged the validity of faith beliefs and tradition in today’s society. They threw out questions like weapons, preparing for battle: How can you believe in G‑d when science has proven . . . ? Why keep kosher in an age of government inspection and refrigeration? Isn’t it racist to speak of the chosen people? How come the religious teachings are against LGBT…?

Sitting at the table was an older rabbi with a ginger beard listening to everything. He began to speak.

“The questions you are asking are good questions, but for this, you don’t need to come to a Shabbos table. Many people who have learned Torah can tell you these answers. Sadly few can speak or communicate in a language you can understand; now let me tell you why you came.”

Everyone, there was surprised the old rabbi could understand their asked and silent questions. The rabbi looking at the flickering Shabbos candles began telling a story.

A young boy was walking with his father down a steep hill in the heat of the day. They saw a man coming up the hill towards them, sweating, with a heavy sack on his shoulders weighing him down. When the man reached them, the little boy asked what he had in his sack, why he was going up the hill, why he was working so hard.

The man told the little boy that his oven had broken, and he had to come down to the valley to get more stones to build himself an oven.

“Why not get more stones,” asked the little boy, “and build a bigger oven that will keep you warmer, and you can have more food? There must be more stones still in the valley.”

The man took a deep breath, wiped the sweat off his brow and answered “little one, you are used to people making things easy for you so you don’t yet know what it means to have to work, how hard it is to schlep.” He put his free hand on the little boy’s shoulder. “When you grow big and strong like me, you’ll be happy with a little oven too.”

The little boy and his father continued down the hill.

They saw another man coming up the hill towards them. Same size man, same size sack, but this man didn’t seem so weighed down.

“What have you in the sack,” the young boy wanted to know. “Is it stones? Are you going to build yourself a small oven?”

“Oh no,” the man smiled broadly, “no oven building for me! See, I was down in the valley digging for turnips, and I found a treasure. Diamonds! Rubies! Pearls! I have two daughters, two weddings to make. I’m going to open a store and stop peddling from town to town, build myself a house with wooden floors and . . .”

“Why not get more diamonds?” interrupted the boy. “There must be more left in the valley.”

“Son,” said the old man, putting his free hand on the little boy’s shoulder, “believe me, I searched the valley clean. I don’t think there is another diamond down there.”

The little boy and his father continued down the hill.

The father turned to his son and explained, “You see when you’re carrying diamonds, they’re never too heavy. The first man may have had diamonds too, but he didn’t know what they were.”

The old rabbi with the long ginger beard looked at the young people around the Shabbos table and continued:

“You see what the father was telling the boy? A mitzvah is a diamond. Every mitzvah that we do is a precious, precious thing. This is why you come to the Shabbos table: not just to learn a mitzvah, but to learn that it is a diamond. When you know they are diamonds, then most of your questions will be answered.”

Some years later, at a Shabbos Table filled with so many different foods, and surrounded by many young people talking of many things from politics to religion. Most of all they challenged the validity of faith beliefs and tradition in today’s society. The questions were a little different, but one key question was, why do we need mitzvahs when we can meditate instead?

A young man got up and told this story that he had heard on a cold wintry night a few blocks from where they were now. He told the story well, and ended with the words, “It’s been a number of years since the rabbi with the ginger beard told that story. I could tell you of many experiences I have had since then, but to you, it would be meaningless.”

It is said that the old rabbi with the ginger beard still tells stories during Shabbos and Yom Tov. He tells stories that touch the heart and soul. The stories are filled with wonder, mystery, and holiness.

Listen to the stories and learn valuable lessons and get direction. You can’t be Jewish out of a sense of duty without feeling or warmth. An “observant Jew”? Such an unsatisfying label. Like an obedient child, a dutiful husband, a law-abiding citizen, an “observant Jew” accepts obligations—yet keeps on trudging. The question is do they really live Jewish?

Duty and diligence are not calculated to inspire; they’re heavy rocks. However, when duty and diligence are born of passion, they are tough as steel and as brilliant diamonds. A heavy load? Maybe, on the scales; but not on my back.

The stories show me the beauty around me every day. They give purpose to my life and teach me tolerance for the many people around me. All of this is possible because of an old rabbi, dressed a little strange and a ginger beard who tells stories. And each story is a diamond.

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A Mess and Shalom Bayis

Jewish people from the time of antiquity have held an ideal standard for Jewish family life that is expressed in the term shalom bayis – Peace in the Home. Shalom bayis implies completeness, wholeness, and fulfillment. In this way, the traditional Jewish marriage is characterized by peace, nurturing, respect, and chesed (loving-kindness), through which a married couple becomes complete. It is believed that The Holy One, blessed be He’s presence dwells in a pure and loving home. (Sotah 17a)

A husband once came to a holy rabbi and told him that he was very angry at his wife and they had been arguing terribly. The holy rabbi thoughtfully asked the young man: “What had your wife done to get you so upset?”


Family Peace

“Every time I come home from work or learning,” the young man began, “I find the floor littered with things like toys, clothing, socks, you name it. These things belong in closets and drawers, not on the floor.”

The young man explained that he had always been an orderly person, and the mess was very annoying to him. “No matter what I tell my wife, it doesn’t help,” he said in frustration.

The holy rabbi thought for a moment or two and then answered the young man:

“Unfortunately, I have to tell you that you are like the people who complained about the manna in the desert. About people like you the Holy One, blessed be He cries, ‘See, you who come into the world, what My children complain about.’ The reason your house is a mess, with objects strewn all over the floor, is because the Holy One, blessed be He granted you children. Go into the home of a couple that does not yet have children, and you will see that everything is clean and in order. Everything is in its proper place. If the floor is washed once at the beginning of the week, it stays clean until the end of the week.”

“If your house is a mess, it’s because of the great chesed (loving-kindness) and mercy that the Holy One, blessed be He did for you. And that’s what you’re complaining about?”

May all your tales end with Shalom (peace)

Click here for more storytelling resources  

Tell it to your children, and let your children tell it to their children, and their children to the next generation. (Joel 1:3)

Please share this story with family and friends and let us know what you think or feel about the stories in a comment or two. Like us on Facebook  or tweet us on Twitter 

Please share this story with others

The Season of Lights – Chanukah  is coming very quickly as it  begins at Sundown On December 12, 2017.  Most people in the Jewish communities throughout the world can rattle off a list of Chanukah traditions such as lighting the menorah each night; playing dreidel games; eating foods cooked in oil (latkes and Sufganiot); and exchanging gifts.

An age old tradition is telling stories in the glow of the Chanukah menorah. The stories tell of greatness, nobility, and wisdom while at the same time raising the hopes for a better tomorrow.

The very backdrop to the spiritual stories is attractive to its readers allowing one to peek into the beliefs, and lifestyles of a vanishing age of a faraway world and reminding them that the messages are eternal – just as strong today as they were yesterday.

The book, Story Tour: The Journey Begins will remind readers of forgotten stories of faith that strengthen and reaffirm hope for a better world.

Buy a copy of Story Tour: The Journey Begins as a gift for someone special today. Story Tour: The Journey Begins is available from the publisher, XlibrisBooksamillion, and Barnes & Noble, and Amazon

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Speech, Wisdom and Protection

A holy rabbi was teaching a lesson to his students when an angry, vulgar and ignorant person insulted him in front of everyone. The holy rabbi did not answer or respond, but calmly went on with his studies as though nothing had occurred.

Many were quick to praise him for his remarkable restraint remembering, “He who hears himself cursed and remains silent is a saintly man.” (Midrash Tehillim 16:11). Others attributed the holy rabbi’s actions because one should “let yourself be cursed, rather than curse” (Sanhedrin 49a). The holy rabbi, however, attributed his control to a higher source than his own inner strength, explaining:

“Our Sages teach that silence acts as a ‘protective zone’ for wisdom. They are referring here to keeping quiet when unjustly attacked, as they state that ‘one who hears himself insulted and does not retaliate, is considered beloved by G-d’ (Shabbos 88b).’ ”

Silence

“It is written that ‘a safeguarding fence around wisdom is silence.’ (Pirke Avos 3:13),  the holy rabbi continued, “then what does wisdom itself consist of?

“It must be,” he finished off, half-jokingly, “that wisdom itself is not to consider oneself slighted in the least when the assailant is someone who is not qualified to make such critical remarks.”

 

It wouldn’t hurt for all of us to maintain such wisdom, and to protect it with a sprinkle of silence.

May all your tales end with Shalom (peace)

Click here for more storytelling resources  

Tell it to your children, and let your children tell it to their children, and their children to the next generation. (Joel 1:3) 

Please share this story with family and friends and let us know what you think or feel about the stories in a comment or two. Like us on Facebook  or tweet us on Twitter

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Tzedakah Magic

Tam and Chacham were collecting tzedakah to provide for the needs of the less fortunate in the community. Everywhere they went they were welcomed and people gave what they could. The need was great and the money they collected was small.

Jewish people give tzedakah, which means “righteousness” and “justice.” When a Jewish person contributes their money, time and resources to the needy, they are not being benevolent, generous or “charitable.” Giving tzedakah is the merely following the teachings of the TaNaCh (Scriptures) where it says:

“If there is among you anyone in need, a member of your community…do not be hard-hearted or tight-fisted toward your needy neighbor. (Deuteronomy 15:7) Do not turn your face away from anyone who is poor, and the face of G-d will not be turned away from you. (Tobit 4:7) Whoever gives to the poor will lack nothing, (Proverbs 28:27)”

There lived in a grand house a very wealthy merchant who refused to contribute to the community charities. Everyone knew he would not contribute to any community cause, so nobody even tried to collect charity from him. Chacham insisted on going door to door collecting what they may, but Tam insisted on going to the home of the wealthy merchant.

They knocked on the fine wooden door and were greeted by the wealthy merchant. He welcomed the guests into his house and offered them some food and drink while discussing holy matters. Chacham began to explain the importance of tzedakah with the wealthy merchant, but he dismissed him saying, “The poor like to complain, they have nothing better to do.”

Chacham became angry, but Tam steered the conversation to the subject of the Egyptian sorcerers and magicians described in the Torah (Scriptures), who were able to imitate some of Moses’s miracles. The rich man revealed that he was modern thinking about all of this, and doubted that anyone could perform either magic or miracles.

“Why do you say that?” Tam asked casually, ignoring the disrespect to the Torah. “Even I can perform miracles. I will gladly do so right now, but only if you donate one-hundred golden coins to charity.” The wealthy merchant accepted the challenge.

“Very well,” Tam said, adjusting his tone to the event. “I will now show you that if you place four piles of twenty-five golden coins on the corners of this table, I will utter only one word, and the money will find its way into the bowl at the center.” The wealthy merchant was trembling with anticipation as he placed the four piles of golden coins on the four corners of the table. “Chacham” Tam called to his companion, who promptly picked up the four piles of golden coins and put them into the bowl. “Well, there you have it! It is just as I said,” Tam confirmed.

Gold Coins

“That is not fair!” the wealthy man howled in protest. “There was no miracle involved in this.”

“No miracle?” Tam mocked, good-naturedly. “You think that getting one-hundred gold coins for charity out of you is not a miracle?”

Everyone had a hearty laugh, and the wealthy merchant was left without ill feelings.

May all your tales end with Shalom (peace)

Click here for more storytelling resources  

Tell it to your children, and let your children tell it to their children, and their children to the next generation. (Joel 1:3) 

Please share this story with family and friends and let us know what you think or feel about the stories in a comment or two.

Like us on Facebook  or tweet us on Twitter

 

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