The Torn Leaf and Stewardship

And G-d blessed them: G-d said to them, “Be fruitful, multiply, fill the earth and subdue it. Rule over the fish in the sea, the birds in the air and every living creature that crawls on the earth.” (Genesis 1:28)

It was summertime, a time for relaxation, and for restoring one’s strength. A holy rabbi was spending some time with his son in the fields and forest outside their village. The two used to take long walks through the countryside, marveling at the beauty of G-d’s world.

The fields were ripe with their golden harvest of wheat. The swollen sheaves swayed gently, promisingly, in the gentle breeze, swishing softly to and fro. It felt good to be alive!

They walked along in silence, enjoying the peace of the area, suddenly the father turned to his son, saying, and “Just look at the marvel of nature! See how G-d has a plan and a purpose for every single stalk of wheat, every puff of wind, the swaying of each blade of grass. Everything is included in G-d’s overall master plan of creation! Is it not marvelous that One so exalted and mighty should consider every tiny, minute speck on this world?”

They continued along the country road, breathing in the fresh air, each one silent with his own thoughts. Soon they came to a forest and continued walking leisurely among the trees. Engrossed in his thoughts, the boy absent-mindedly plucked a leaf off a branch. He held the leaf in his hand and from time to time would unconsciously tear off a bit and throw it away.

Tree of Life Leaf

His father noticed what he was doing and commented, “I don’t understand how you can do something destructive like that without thinking. Don’t you know that even a leaf is part of creation, that it has its purpose? Did I not just tell you how G-d guides the destiny of every tiny thing, even a leaf? Don’t you realize that a leaf is also a living thing; it breathes and grows. Why is the ‘I’ of a leaf any different than the ‘I’ of a human being? To be sure, you can think and speak while it is only a plant. Still, just as you, a human being, have a task to fill in this world, so does this leaf have a purpose to accomplish during its lifetime on this world. Are we not taught, “But I am like a leafy olive tree in the house of G-d; I put my trust in the grace of G-d forever and ever.” (Psalm 52:10)

It is important to remember that “when G-d created the first human beings, He led them around the Garden of Eden and said: “Look at my works! See how beautiful they are. How Excellent! For your sake, I created them all. See to it that you do not spoil and destroy My world: for, if you do, there will be no one else to repair it. (Kohelles Rabbah 7:13)

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A Story of Two Merchants

Every day the blessing, “Blessed are you G-d, our L-rd, King of the universe who forms light and creates darkness, who makes peace and creates all things” is said and is overlooked. Many don’t realize that this blessing is based on, “I form the light, and create darkness; I make peace, and create evil; I am the L-rd, that does all these things. (Isaiah 45:7). One should bless the good (“I form the light…I make peace) as well as the bad (create darkness…create evil).

A question is asked, “What is the verse that alludes to this? ‘I will sing of loving-kindness and justice; unto you, O L-rd, will I sing praises’ (Psalms 101:1). Rav Acha explains: If it is loving-kindness, I will sing, and if it is justice, I will sing.” (Berachos 60b) In other words I will thank G-d in song for the bad just as for the good.

Blessings for Good and Bad

It once happened that two merchants agreed to set out on a journey to a faraway city to go to a fair to buy wares to sell in their village. They equipped themselves with all the needs and supplies for the voyage.  Together they made their way to the harbor to board a ship. As they walked through the streets, one of them stumbled and hurt his foot so badly that he was forced to cancel his trip.

The ship had weighed anchor and unfurled its sails and was ready to set sail and could not wait for the unfortunate merchant to heal from his wound. So his companion went with all the other merchants, while the merchant who had fallen and became injured remained behind, bitter and angry. He was very angry at his bad luck because he had injured his leg and could not travel with the other merchants. His anger and bitterness of losing all the profit he might have made from the journey to such a point that he complained and freely cursed the ways of heaven.

After some time news came that the ship had sunk in the sea, and all the merchants aboard had drowned. When the injured merchant heard what had happened, he began to give thanks to the Holy One, blessed be He by whose kindness he had fallen and injured his leg. The merchant realized that if he had gone on the ship he would have been lost with all the other merchants. The merchant regretted all the curses and complaints he had made and repented for all the things he had said of heaven. The merchant began to praise and extol the wonders of heaven. That’s why it says in the Book of Isaiah, “Your anger has subsided and You have comforted me.” (12:1)

What is meant by the verse, “G-d Who alone does wondrous things; blessed is His glorious Name forever” (Psalms 72:18,19)? Even the person for whom the miracle is performed is unaware of the miracle, only G-d knows it.

Based on Nidah 31a

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A Salty Conversation

Two rabbis once set out together on a three-day journey to do a d’var mitzvah (a deed of religious importance) in a town somewhere in the countryside in a faraway country.

Along the way they stopped at an inn known for its high stan­dards of keeping kosher. The woman who owned the inn showed the holy rabbis to a special table where they could eat and discuss holy things.

She served them with great respect, and when they finished the meal she approached them and asked, “So how did you like my food?” she asked the rabbis. “Oh, it was quite good,’ one of the rabbis replied, ” but it could have used just a little more salt.”

As the woman left, the other holy rabbi turned white. “I can’t believe it” he sighed. “All my life I have avoided speaking or listening to unkind speech and now Hashem made me come with you, and I have to suffer by hearing you speak such unkind words. I regret that I came here with you and I am convinced that the purpose of our trip is not truly a holy mission after all. Otherwise this would not have happened.”

Seeing the rabbi’s reaction, his companion became flustered and frightened. “What did I say that was so wrong?” he stammered. “I said that the food was good — I only added that it needed some salt. Surely you know that ‘all dishes require salt’. (Beitza 14a)”

“You simply don’t realize the power of words” cried the upset rabbi. “Speech is a G-d given gift peculiar to man, and must not be employed for that which is degrading. (Maimonides, guide for the perplexed 3.8 c. 1190). Our hostess probably doesn’t do her own cooking. Her cook could well be a poor widow who needs this job to support her children. Now, because of what you said, the owner will go back to the kitchen and complain to the cook that the food didn’t have enough salt. In self defense the poor widow will deny it and will say, “Of course I put enough salt in the food. I even tasted it before you served it.”

 Jewish cook

“The owner will then accuse her of lying and say, “Do you think that the holy rabbis out there are liars? You are the one who is lying!” They will argue, strong words will lead to even stronger words and the owner will get so angry that she will fire the poor cook. The woman will then be out of a job. Look how many sins you caused:

You spoke unkind words;

you caused the owner and myself to listen to unkind words;

you caused the owner to repeat the unkind words and that is the sin of rechilus (speech that potentially can cause ill will between people);

you caused the cook to lie;

because of you the owner caused pain to a widow, and

you caused an argument, another Torah violation.”

The rabbi smiled at the holy rabbi, his companion and said softly and respectfully, “Rabbi, please, you are exag­gerating. You’re carrying this just a bit too far. A few simple words cannot possibly have done all that.”

“If that is what you think,” replied the holy rabbi as he stood up, “let’s go to the kitchen and see for ourselves.”

As they opened the door to the kitchen, they saw that the owner was indeed scolding the cook as the poor woman stood wiping the tears from her eyes. When the rabbi saw what was happening he became pale and ran over to the cook, begged forgiveness and apologized profusely for any harm or distress he may have caused her. He pleaded with the owner to forgive and forget the incident and begged her to let the woman stay on the job. He even offered to pay her to keep the cook.

The innkeeper was really a kindly woman and she also wanted to do as the rabbi asked. ” “It shall be as you ask, she said hastily. ” I only wanted to impress on her the need to be more careful. She is really a fine cook and she will remain here at her job.”

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Flame, Clay, Glass and Breath

Once upon a time there was a man who lived in the ancient city of Tzipori whose son had died. A man of no belief sat by his side. Rabbi Jose ben Chalafta came to visit the grieving father. The man of no belief saw that he was smiling and heard him greet the grieving father “Baruch dayan ha-emes” (Blessed is the True Judge.) The man of no belief asked, “Rabbi, How can you be so insensitive and why are you smiling?”

The rabbi replied, “I trust in G-d and believe that the man will see his son again in the World to Come.”

The man of no belief then said, “Is not his sorrow enough for the man that you should come and sadden him even more? Can broken shards be made to fit together again? Is it not written, “you will dash them to pieces like pottery (Psalms 2:9) And further it is not taught in your books, “just as this potter’s jar is smashed and cannot be repaired. They will bury the dead” (Jeremiah 19:11)?

The rabbi replied, “Earthen vessels are made by wa­ter and perfected by fire. Vessels of glass are both made by fire and perfected by fire. Earthen ones, if broken, can­not be repaired, but glass ones, if broken, can be repaired.”

The man of no belief accused, “How silly are you. Everyone knows that once glass is broken it shatters into thousands of shards, never to be repaired. What you say is impossible.”

The rabbi replied, “Glass vessels are made by blowing. If the glass vessel that is made by the blowing air, and when shattered can be heated by fire and again blown with air and be repaired. Then a soul and life can be blown into a mortal person by the Holy One, blessed be He. For are we not taught ‘Then G-d formed man of the dust of the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life; and man became a living soul’ (Genesis 2:7)

Breath of Life

The man of no belief replied, “your thoughts are not the way of the world and your ways are strange for you choose not to see or believe the wisdom of the world.”

The rabbi looked upon the man of no belief and sadly shook his head and answered, “The wonders of creation and all that is in this world and the next are gifts from G-d. We learn about people like you where it is written, ‘Fools mock at sin, but the upright enjoy God’s favor.’ (Proverbs 14:9)”

Based on Bereishis Rabbah 14:7

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Mottel the Vassertreyger

Mottel the Vassertreyger worked all day carrying water to all his customers. He was not very learned and tried but he just couldn’t understand the words. He had a big heart and tried to live according to the traditions of the Jewish people. Sadly, there were those who made fun of him because he didn’t know a lot of Torah, he stumbled through his prayers and never learned Talmud.

If anyone needed water for Shabbos, Yom Tov or for any holy purpose, Mottel would bring them all they needed without charge. There was alte Chaya Sora who always had her fill of water and Mottel refused to accept even the smallest coin from her. Mottel always made sure the two barrels at the shul were always full.

Rarely was he called up to the Torah on Shabbos as he would stumble through the blessings.  But when a strong person would be needed for hagbah, he’d open the holy Torah on the bimah (reading table), spread his arms and lift the Sacred Scroll as high as he could. When he would hold the wooden handles and the congregation would sing Ve-zos ha-torah asher sam mosheh lifnei benei yisrael, al pi Adoshem b’yad mosheh” (And this is the Torah which Moses set before the children of Israel, according to the commandment of the L-rd by the hand of Moses.) the words would wrap around his heart. A tear would form in his eye as he felt the parchment feel his joy and Mottel could almost see each word, sometimes each letter of the Law rise off the holy Torah scroll to dance around him.

Ancient scroll. Vector illustration

Mottel came to the shul for Leil Tikkun Shavuous (the custom of engaging in all-night Torah study the first night of Shavuous) but could not understand the studies, but waited patiently for the stories and songs of the night. Each story and song touched Mottel’ s heart. He knew that the words to the Torah song “etz chayim hi lamachazikim ba, Vesomecheha me’ushar. Deracheha – darechei noam, Vechol nesivosecha shalom (It is a tree of life to them that grasp it, and of them that uphold it every one is rendered happy. Its ways are ways of pleasantness, and all its paths are peace.) was about him.

The Ten Commandments were read from the Torah on Shavuous and Mottel felt the holy words deep inside. Then someone called him for hagbah, he was chosen to hold the Torah high so everyone could see it, just like Moshe did on Mount Sinai.

 Mottel the Vassertreyger can feel the fire of G-d’s Word. Mottel didn’t know a lot of Torah, he stumbled through his prayers and never learned Talmud. Mottel doesn’t need to. The words know him.

May all your tales end with Shalom (peace)

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A Sofer’s Son’s Story

Dovid loved his father who everyday went into a special room just to write beautiful and important things. The most important were Torah scrolls, tefillin and mezuzahs. Dovid’s father “was a scribe, expert in the law of Moses that the L-rd  G-d of Israel had given (Ezra 7:6).

One morning, after his father went to the old wooden shul to pray, Dovid quietly went into his father’s special room to write his own Torah. The room was so neat, the surface of his father’s writing desk clean and ready. Dovid took a sheet of parchment from a large wooden drawer. He took a jar of ink and a quill off the shelf and climbed into his father’s chair so he could reach the top of the desk. He poured some ink into a small glass just like his father. And as he dipped the quill into the ink, he trembled a little as he was filled with awe and joy at the same time. Dovid would write his own Torah! The Torah of his father and his father’s father, who received it from the rabbis, who received it from the prophets, who received it from the judges, who received it from Joshua, who received it from Moses himself, who stood in G-d’s Holy Presence at Mount Sinai. And for a moment Dovid was there, he was there at Mount Sinai with Moshe and Aaron and Miriam. Dovid saw the pillar of fire and the pillar of cloud. He heard the strong voice of the Holy One, blessed be He began to speak the words that all nations heard and the deafening silence that followed. He watched as G-d held the holy mountain over the people’s heads. And Dovid the sofer’s son said to no one in particular, “Na’aseh v’neeshma. I will do, and I will listen.” (Exodus 24:7)

Torah Story Tour

So Dovid began to write the first few words, Bereishis (In the beginning), Barah. (created), Elokim (G-d). “Yes!” Dovid thought. What could be more true and perfect and full of love then G-d in the beginning creating the world and us in order of give us the most beautiful and holy book ever? In order to give it to me?

Just then, his father walked into the study. Dovid looked up at his father and looked back at his work. Drips of ink on the desk. Smudges on the back of the parchment. And three beautiful words of Torah.

“Taty, I’m writing a Torah.”

Torah script

His father picked him up and scolded him and told Dovid

never to do this again

and that Dovid did a beautiful job and

never to do this again

and how proud Papa was of Dovid and

never to do this again.

His father put Dovid back in the chair, a tear of joy in his eye. “We’ll clean this up together.”

But in his heart his father said:

Baruch atah Hashem Elokeinu Melech ha-Olam shecheyanu v’kiy’manu v’higyanu lazman hazeh.” (Blessed are You, O L-rd our G-d, for giving us life, sustaining us and allowing us to reach this joyous time.)

And G-d looked down at Dovid and his father and all the beautiful and holy words they had made had made. And G-d said, “Tov Me-od.” It is very good.

May all your tales end with Shalom (peace)

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Judge Others Favorably

We speak and learn so much about religion, values, prayer and ritual, yet forget the important aspects of faith. To live by the standards established in the holy words of the T’NaCh (Scriptures). We should look upon all around us favorably and give them the benefit of the doubt.

The rabbis taught about two thousand years ago: “In righteousness you shall judge your neighbor… with justice you shall judge your neighbor. (Lev. 19:15.) When you see a person doing what appears to be wrong, take a favorable view of his action.” (Shevu’os 30a)

Judging others favorably not only fulfills a religious requirement, it provides a number of benefits.

Vayikra 19-15

A 13th century Spanish rabbi wrote a book which systematically discusses the 613 commandments of the Torah (Scriptures) in which he “stated  that  each  person is required to judge others favorably …promotes peace and friendship and therefore, the purpose of this mitzvah (the mitzvah to judge righteously) is to improve society with a sense of righteousness and provide peace by removing suspicion of one to another. (Sefer HaChinuch no. 235)

The Mishna in Pirkei Avot directs that “One should judge all people favorably.” (Avot 1:6)  Rabbeinu Yonah (d. 1263), in his commentary to Avot 1 :6, writes that we should assume that they realize their mistakes and are working on trying to improve themselves. This concept is often associated with the prohibition against accepting evil speech and gossip.

Avos1-6

Once upon a time a religious man ransomed a beautiful woman from prison, and when they came to the inn in the evening, he put the young woman to sleep at the foot of his bed. In the morning he immersed himself in the purifying waters, and then he went to teach his students. While he was teaching them he asked his students, “Did you suspect me of anything last night when you saw the young maiden lying at the foot of my bed?” They answered, “We did not suspect you of anything; we thought that you put her near you because you had among your students one whom you did not know, and you would not let her sleep in a separate room for fear that harm might come to her.”

Then the religious man asked, “Why did you think I went in the morning and immersed in the purifying waters?”

“What else do you believe we could have thought,” replied his students, “except that probably on the way you had touched something unclean which made it necessary for you to immerse in the purifying waters?”

Then he said, “I swear that it was exactly as you thought. And as for you–as you judged me on the scale of merit, so may He who is everywhere judge you on the scale of merit

Based on B. Shabbos 127b and Ma’asah Book #21

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Matzah and Shalom Bayis (Peace in the Family)

The rabbi’s wife was busy in the kitchen with all the last-minute preparations for the Seder, when there was a knock at the door. A young girl who was helping in the rabbi’s house prepare for the Seder, as Pesach (Passover) was always special with the holy rabbi, answered the knock at the door. Someone had come to the home of the holy rabbi with a request for matzah for the seder. Seeing a stack of matzos wrapped up in a napkin, the young girl who opened the door innocently gave them away and hurried back to work. Puffing and steaming, the rabbi’s wife came along soon after and saw that the matzos had vanished. She was shocked, these were none other than the select matzos which had been baked that same day with holy intentions, and with all manner of careful precautions against chametz, were baked for the holy rabbi’s Seder, it was too late to undo. She felt her heart sag within her. How could she tell her husband of the mishap and cause him spiritual anguish? There was only one thing to do. She took a bundle of plain, ordinary matzos, deftly wrapped them up in the very same napkin, and pretended to know nothing of the whole affair. That same evening, her husband conducted the Seder with the ordinary matzos.

3shmurah2BlkBkgrnd

Soon after the festival was over, the holy rabbi was visited by a couple seeking a divorce.

“What makes you want to divorce your wife?” he asked the husband.

The young man answered that his wife had refused his request to cook for him during Pesach in separate utensils without shruyah — for it is the custom of certain pious folk to avoid allowing even baked matzah to come in contact with water throughout the festival.

Hearing this, the holy rabbi called for his wife and said, “Tell me the whole truth, please. What kind of matzos were placed before me at the Seder table?”

The rabbi’s wife was afraid to speak up, so she held her peace.

“Do tell me, please,” he reassured her; “have no fear.”

The rabbi’s wife mumbled the truth: “Ordinary matzos, because I did not want to cause you any anguish …” And she proceeded to tell the whole story.

The holy rabbi then turned to the over-zealous young husband standing before him, “Look here, my son,” he said. “On the first night of Pesach I ate plain, ordinary matzah and pretended not to know nor sense the difference, in order that I should not be brought to expressing hard feelings or harsh words, God forbid — and you want to divorce your wife because of shruyah, the way she cooks?!”

The tzaddik then restored harmony between them, and they left him in peace.

As Jewish people all over the world gather for their Seders may they offer up heartfelt prayers for peace

World

May all your tales end with Shalom (peace)

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Tell it to your children, and let your children tell it to their children, and their children to the next generation. (Joel 1:3) Please share this story with family and friends and leave us a comment or two.

The Story Tour Blog has grown to over 250 short stories about faith. Many visitors to the Story Tour Blog have requested that the stories be gathered together into a book. 72 of these special tales are now available in the new book

Story Tour: The Journey Begins

Story Tour Book
This special book of stories would be a nice Pesach/Afikomen Gift Available at Amazon andBarnes & Noble
 Click here for the the new book, Story Tour: The Journey Begins filled with 72 stories from the Story Tour Blog
 

The Beggar’s Seder

This story was posted on the Story Tour Blog in April 2009, we dusted it off and removed the chometz and have it ready for Passover this year. Enjoy and share with others, or even at your Seder table.

Pesach (Passover) was approaching quickly and everyone was preparing for the holiday. Once two Jewish beggars were traveling together. One beggar told the other to go to the shul (synagogue), and the Jewish householders would have pity on him and invite him to a Passover Seder.

Story Tour Seder Stories

And so it was, both beggars were invited to seders. The evening started with Kiddush (the blessing over wine), and the one beggar thought to himself:

“Good wine means good food.”

As the seder continued to karpas, the beggar was given a green vegetable and thought:

“Wine now a piece of salad, this is going to be a great meal.”

The seder progressed as there was much discussion until it came to the part of matzah. The beggar was given a piece of matzah, and thought,

“Thank goodness the meal is about to begin.”

After eating the matzah, the beggar was given a piece of maror (bitter herb – horseradish) which burned his mouth and made his eyes water. He jumped up from the table and ran out the door.

“How was your Seder?” asked one beggar to the other. The unhappy beggar then told him what had happened. They gave me 2 cups of wine, a sprig of parsley, a dried cracker (matzah) and hot stuff. It was torture so got up and left!” 

“Fool!” replied the one beggar to the other. “If you had waited just a little longer, you would have had a fine meal, as I had.”

Story Tour Seder Stories

The same is true when we want to come close to G-d. After all the effort to begin, we are given a little bitterness. This bitterness is needed to purify the body. But we might think that this bitterness is all there is to serving G-d, so we run away from it. This is a mistake. If we would only wait just a short while — if we would allow ourselves to be purified – then we would experience every joy and delight in the world in our closeness to G-d.

May all your tales end with Shalom (peace)

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Tell it to your children, and let your children tell it to their children, and their children to the next generation. (Joel 1:3) Please share this story with family and friends and leave us a comment or two.

The Story Tour Blog has grown to over 250 short stories about faith. Many visitors to the Story Tour Blog have requested that the stories be gathered together into a book. 72 of these special tales are now available in the new book

Story Tour: The Journey Begins

Story Tour Book

This special book of stories would be a nice Pesach/Afikomen Gift Available at Amazon and Barnes & Noble

 Click here for the the new book, Story Tour: The Journey Begins filled with 72 stories from the Story Tour Blog

The Simple Seder is the Greater Seder

One Passover, after the conclusion of the Seder, the holy Rebbe of Berditchev felt very satisfied. He had fulfilled all the Passover mitzvos carefully and carried out all the mystic intentions associated with them. As he reviewed his behavior, his thoughts were interrupted by a heavenly voice:

“Don’t be so proud of your Seder. In your city, there is a poor Jewish water carrier whose Seder far surpassed yours.”

Disturbed and curious, the Rebbe dispatched some of his students to bring the water carrier to him. Despite the lateness of the hour, the students set out to fulfill their teacher’s request. Unfortunately, the water carrier was not a known person in the village and none of the students were sure where he lived.

After a considerable search, the students located the water carrier’s home and knocked at the door. Somewhat astonished to see the Rebbe’s attendants arrive at her home so late at night, the water carrier’s wife opened the door.

When the students asked to see her husband, she shyly answered “He can’t speak to you now.”

“But the Rebbe wants to see him,” they insisted.

Realizing that they would not take no for an answer, she pointed to their bedroom. “There he is, lying on the bed. He’s stone drunk. What could the Rebbe want from him?”

Without pausing to answer, the students approached the sleeping water carrier and tried to wake him. Unable to rouse him, they were forced to carry him to the Rebbe. In the holy rabbi’s presence, the water carrier began to come to his senses. When the Rebbe looked him in the eye, he began to cry continuously.

With soothing words, the Rebbe gently calmed his guest. When he regained his composure, the holy rabbi asked him: “Tell me about your Seder.”

Again the water carrier burst into tears. After calming him once more, the Rebbe assured him there was no need to worry. His Seder had found favor in G-d’s eyes and he, the holy rabbi, wanted to learn from it.

Stuttering, his words interrupted by occasional sobs, the water carrier began to tell his story:

“There’s one custom which I have adopted that I follow loyally. Each morning after prayers, I take a little vodka and say l’chayim to to the Holy One, blessed be He.

“This morning, after following my daily custom, it occurred to me that since I wouldn’t be able to drink alcohol for the next eight days, I should say I’chayim for the entire holiday. Without thinking much longer, I downed eight more l’chayims. My head became groggy and I went to sleep.

Pesach 8 LeChaims

“I slept very soundly without realizing how the hours passed by. At nightfall, my wife tried to wake me to go to shul, but I couldn’t get out of bed. When everybody was coming home, she tried to wake me again, but I just turned to the other side.

“She waited a little longer, then, came to wake me a third time. Shaking me with all her strength, she cried: “Husband! It’s Pesach! What about the seder? All the Jewish people are celebrating the holiday. What about us?'”

“I felt terrible. She was almost crying. Summoning whatever strength I could, I stumbled to the table and began to speak: “I am a simple person and my father was a simple person. I can’t read Hebrew and don’t know what we’re supposed to say now, but I know one thing about Passover. Our ancestors were slaves to the Egyptians and G-d took them out of exile. We’re in exile again now. May G-d redeem us very soon.”

“Afterwards, I noticed that my wife had prepared matzos, wine, eggs, and some vegetables on the table. I drank the wine, ate the food, and went back to bed. That was my Seder.”

Passover Greeting

The holy Rebbe of Berditchev again assured the water carrier that his Seder had been accepted by G-d and asked his students to take him home. When they returned, he told them: “The few words he said, he said with all his heart, and therefore. G-d appreciated his Seder.”

May all your tales end with Shalom (peace)

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Tell it to your children, and let your children tell it to their children, and their children to the next generation. (Joel 1:3) Please share this story with family and friends and leave us a comment or two.

The Story Tour Blog has grown to over 250 short stories about faith. Many visitors to the Story Tour Blog have requested that the stories be gathered together into a book. 72 of these special tales are now available in the new book

Story Tour: The Journey Begins

Story Tour Book

This special book of stories would be a nice Pesach/Afikomen Gift Available at Amazon and Barnes & Noble

 Click here for the the new book, Story Tour: The Journey Begins filled with 72 stories from the Story Tour Blog